What Difference Does it Make if Gove Recognises Animals as Sentient?

The following is a guest post by Elliott Woodhouse, who is an independent researcher, and a member of ShARC. *** Michael Gove’s recent statement confirms that the British Government will continue to legally recognise the sentience (which Gove defines as the ability to feel pain and emotion) of nonhuman animals after withdrawing from the EU.[1] This comes after MPs voted down Green Party MP Caroline Lucas’s proposed amendment to recognise nonhuman animal sentience in the EU Withdrawal Bill. Michael Gove’s decision to keep the UK’s legal attitude towards nonhuman animals in line with…continue reading →

Bearing Witness to a Disappearing World: Poetry in a Time of Mass Extinction, by Dr Michael Malay

The following is a guest post by Dr Michael Malay, who is an Early Career Leverhulme Fellow at the University of Bristol, and a member of ShARC. *** Bearing Witness to a Disappearing World: Poetry in a Time of Mass Extinction In ‘Blacksmith Shop’, Czeslaw Milosz describes a childhood visit to the local smithy. He remembers the blacksmith standing above the anvil, hammering away at a piece of iron, and the incredible heat of the furnace. A group of horses stand outside, ready to be shod, while a collection of tools await repair:…continue reading →

Gove promises that UK law will recognise animal sentience – but …

The following is a post by ShARC co-founder Dr Alasdair Cochrane, Senior Lecturer in Political Theory at the University of Sheffield *** Michael Gove released a statement on Thursday confirming that after Brexit, animals will continue to be recognised as sentient beings: that is, as individuals capable of feeling pain and emotion. The statement emerged after a furore this week over MPs' decision to reject Caroline Lucas's amendment to include this formal recognition of animal sentience in the EU (Withdrawal) Bill. Campaigners argued that the decision of the UK marked a significant step…continue reading →

Event Report: Utopian Protein, or Eating Well in the World to Come – a talk by Dr John Miller, University of Sheffield

The following is a guest post by Mira Lieberman, who is a PhD candidate at the University of Sheffield, funded by the Grantham Centre for Future Sustainability, and a member of ShARC. *** Utopian Protein, or Eating Well in the World to Come – a talk by Dr John Miller, University of Sheffield, reported on faithfully by Mira Lieberman The first description of protein molecules by Gerardus Johannes Mulder in 1838 marks a crucial turning point for societal relationships with animals as a primary source of protein ‘providers’. However, the human relationship with…continue reading →

Film Review: Okja

Last week ShARC held a screening of the Netflix original movie, Okja. Okja is about a 14 year old girl Mija and her relationship with Okja, the ‘super pig’. The film opens in what appears to be a rundown warehouse, where CEO of Mirando Corporation, Lucy Mirando, reveals to the media that her organisation has discovered a new pig-like species in Chile, which they intend to put into production for meat starting 10 years from the present day, 2007. Lucy claims that this new species is superior to all others in existence, as…continue reading →

Event report: Animal and Disability Liberation at iHuman’s Animal-Human-Machine

This is a guest post by ShARC cofounder Dr Seán McCorry on behalf of the ShARC Blog Team. *** Disability rights activists and animal liberationists have not often found themselves working towards common goals in political coalitions. From the assertion of shared humanity, which has been a crucial strategy in disability activism, to the frequently problematic way in which disability has been invoked by prominent animal rights philosophers, it is probably fair to say that relationships between zoocentric and anti-ableist thinkers have been characterised by an amount of mutual suspicion. More recently, though,…continue reading →

ShARC Blog

Welcome to the ShARC Blog! The Sheffield Animal Studies Research Centre (ShARC) is the home of animal studies at the University of Sheffield.  Sheffield has an unusually large number of scholars and students from different disciplines working on the broad theme of human-animal relations. The purpose of this blog is twofold: to provide a platform for some of the research we are undertaking; but also to offer our scholarly thoughts on all things animal studies – whether they be events, workshops, news stories, legal changes, movies, documentaries, and so on. The ShARC Blog…continue reading →