Melencolia’s Sheep

The following is a guest post by Sheffield Animals cofounder Dr John Miller. We welcome contributors to our project blog. Please email s.mccorry@sheffield.ac.uk for more information. ---------------------------------- Albrecht Dürer’s 1514 engraving Melencolia 1 has attracted renewed attention in recent years for the significance of the animal at the feet of the brooding eponymous figure. This is commonly thought of as Melancholia’s Dog, in the title of Alice Kuzniar’s book. As John Ruskin wrote of the image as a whole, ‘What it means—no one knows’; its ambiguity runs parallel to Kuzniar’s memorable, exasperated confession in…continue reading →

Arthur Miller’s Bees

This post was produced  by Dr Robert McKay as part of the Think About Bees project, a creative collaboration between academics from the University of Sheffield and the artists Anthony Bennett, Paul Evans, and Hondartza Fraga. Work informed by this workshop, and by the artists’ own thoughts and research, will be on display in the The Winter Garden, next to the Millennium Galleries, Sheffield from 27th March until 4th April 2016. *** One of the most enduring melittological manuals–still available in a number of reprint editions–is How to Keep Bees, first published in 1911,…continue reading →

Research Seminar: Liz Tyson and Ahmad Safi on Animal Advocacy in Occupied Palestine, Thurs. 3rd March, 5pm

Sheffield Animals Research Colloquium warmly invites you to attend our research seminar, which takes place in Jessop West Seminar Room 7 from 5-6pm on Thursday 3rd March. Liz Tyson (Palestinian Animal League) will be presenting a paper (co-written with Ahmad Safi) on animal advocacy in Palestine. Activism under occupation: the unique challenges in seeking social justice in Palestine This lecture will outline the unique challenges, dangers, obstacles and opportunities faced by social justice campaigners in Palestine. Using the work of the Palestinian Animal League and the ongoing human rights struggle against the occupation of Palestinian…continue reading →

Never Mind the Butterflies, Here’s the Snooker Players

The following is a guest post by Sheffield Animals cofounder Robert McKay. We welcome contributors to our project blog. Please email s.mccorry@sheffield.ac.uk for more information. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Never Mind the Butterflies, Here’s the Snooker Players; or, Crypto-Fascism on Green Baize If a crowd laughs and cheers when someone powerful crushes something delicate and beautiful, you know something has gone very wrong…  Do you love to watch exuberant displays of moving colour? Do you find it hard not to admire nature’s capacity to produce ecstatically beautiful but inherently random patterns of colour through adaptations within a…continue reading →

More-than-Human Life Well-Lived?

The following is a guest post by Sheffield Animals cofounder Robert McKay, originally presented to the ‘A Life Well Lived?’ roundtable event as part of Being Human: A Festival of the Humanities. We welcome contributors to our project blog. Please email s.mccorry@sheffield.ac.uk for more information. ---------------------------------------------- 1. Let me begin with a story. When I was aged four I went on holiday with my parents to a cottage on an arable farm at the Kyles of Tongue on the north coast of Scotland. One day, I disappeared. Desperately searching for me in the farm…continue reading →

Research Seminar: Michael Lawrence on the film zoo, Friday 27th Nov, 3pm-4.30pm

Sheffield Animals Research Colloquium warmly invites you to attend our next research seminar, which takes place in Jessop West Seminar Room 8 from 3pm-4.30pm on Friday 27th November. Michael Lawrence 'Families and Photographs in We Bought A Zoo (2011) and Our Zoo (2014)' This presentation will examine the function of photographic images, practices and technologies in two recent family-oriented representations of family-managed zoos, the Hollywood feature film We Bought A Zoo (Cameron Crowe, 2011) and the BBC television series Our Zoo (2014), both of which are based on true stories. Drawing on the…continue reading →