Upcoming Events

ShARC are delighted to be hosting Laura D. Gelfand (Fulbright Research Fellow 2018-19, Department of the History of Art, University of York / Professor of Art History, Utah State University) for a talk entitled ‘From she-wolf to hoary heathstepper and beyond: Inventing and representing the big bad wolf.’

In Scotland, plans for the controlled release of wolves into a fenced-off private estate still face strong resistance, while in the U.S., the Trump administration is attempting to strip protections from endangered grey wolves to facilitate trophy hunting. Today’s antipathy toward wolves has a long history, but the animal hasn’t always been hated. Many ancient cultures both feared and admired the wolf, associating it with their most important deities. However, by the Early Middle Ages the wolf was transformed into a palimpsest onto which a dense network of terrifying signs was inscribed. Anglo-Saxon poems describe the wolf as a hoary heathstepper, a monstrous creature embodying the worst aspects of humankind, and exiled outlaws were condemned to bear a wolf’s-head (caput lupinum), indicating that both man and beast could be killed on sight. Analysing medieval and Early Modern visual and textual representations, this paper explores how, when, and why the wolf has been demonized so effectively.

We’ll be meeting in Jessop Building Ensemble Room from 3-5pm on Tuesday 5th March 2019. We hope to see many of you there!

 

Animal Remains, 29-30 April 2019

Humanities Research Institute, The University of Sheffield

Keynote Speakers:

Lucinda Cole, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Thom van Dooren, The University of Sydney, Australia

Artist in Residence:

Steve Baker, The University of Central Lancashire, UK

Animal remains are everywhere. From the cryogenically-preserved DNA of the extinct Po’ouli bird held in storage at the Frozen Zoo to the ivory tusks of African elephants that flood the market of the illegal wildlife trade, animal bodies have been fashioned into commodities, fetishized visual objects, colonial artifacts, meat, carrion, taxidermic trophies, and biotechnological innovations. Decomposed organic compounds that were once ancient animal and vegetable remains are also converted into fuel and an array of petro-products, while dinosaurs and other prehistoric species make frequent appearances in recent science fiction films like Jurassic World.

The fossil in particular has emerged as contested theoretical terrain, as Elizabeth Povinelli suggests in her critique of settler late liberalism (Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism). The fossil is regarded as the “endpoint” of the biological image in W.J.T. Mitchell’s Image Science, and as the threshold that marks the crossover of living things into the “world of rocks” (Manuel DeLanda). Meanwhile, for speculative realists like Timothy Morton, it is a “hyperobject” characterized by its “sensuous connectivity” and withdrawal from humans (Hyperobjects). As Elizabeth Kolbert points out in The Sixth Extinction, the fossil has only relatively recently afforded animals a history, because prior to the seventeenth century, the “category of extinction didn’t exist.” In studies of the Anthropocene, the fossil gestures to the geological as well as the “intersecting biological and chemical” transformations that “intermesh human and natural histories,” according to Stacy Alaimo (“Your Shell on Acid”). Indeed, the fossil — and animal remains more broadly conceived — hover at the periphery of a number of critical inquiries across the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, but have yet to receive sustained and thoughtful engagement.

Building on these emerging developments, this international and cross-disciplinary conference will examine the material histories and futures of animal remains. In which ways, and to what effect, are animal remains figured in narratological frameworks (David HermanSusan McHugh)? Can animal remains incite us to imagine extinction (Ursula HeiseThom Van Dooren), and if so, how? What are the material, affective, philosophical, ecological, and biological afterlives of dead animals (Rachel PoliquinSamuel J.M.M. Alberti)? With the sixth mass extinction underway, how do we apprehend the sheer scale and scope of animal remains, given the hyper-visibility of some, and the invisibility of others? What are the political and ethical stakes involved in our treatment of animal remains? This conference invites a broad exploration of these kinds of questions. Possible topics or sub-fields include petrocultures, zooarchaeology, dinosaur iconology, zoological gardens, museological/memory studies, cryptozoology, wildlife conservation, de-extinction movements, bio-/cryopolitics, neo-vitalist philosophy, ecologies of putrefaction (see Lucinda Cole), spatial geographies of rot (see Jamie Lorimer), new materialisms (inclusive of what Kim Tallbear calls “an indigenous metaphysic”), decolonizing animals, animal remains and art, extinction studies, and beyond.

Call for Papers:

Abstracts of 350 words, along with a 50-word bio (in email body or in doc.x), can be sent to Sarah Bezan (s.bezan@sheffield.ac.uk) and Robert McKay (r.mckay@sheffield.ac.uk) by November 23rd, 2018. Early career scholars and post-graduate researchers are expressly encouraged to submit abstracts, and will be eligible to apply for ShARC Travel Awards to defray the costs of travel. Confirmed participants will be notified by late December 2018. An edited volume on ‘Animal Remains’ will be one of the anticipated outcomes of this meeting, and will be considered for publication in the Palgrave Studies in Animals and Literature series.

This conference is generously supported by BIOSEC and the White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities

 

Past events

ShARC Tales, 8-9 November 2018

Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield

We’re pleased to be able to announce full details of our inaugural ShARC Tales Workshop. This will be a two-day programme, taking place the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield, on Thursday 8th and Friday 9th November 2018.

The programme includes a public keynote from Professor of Political Science and Asian American Studies at University of California, Irvine, Claire Jean Kim (author of the award-winning book, Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species, and Nature in a Multicultural Age) and a special roundtable presentation from Siobhan O’Sullivan, Visiting Fellow at ShARC and Senior Lecturer in Political Science at The University of New South Wales. The event will also feature an interview with Claire Jean Kim (recorded live) for the podcast Knowing Animals.

The aim of the workshop is to foster a stronger core network of animal studies students and researchers at The University of Sheffield that allows for interdisciplinary collaborations and a cross-pollination of ideas between faculties and departments.

The event is organised by ShARC and supported by the BIOSEC Project.

Please note that, with the exception of Claire Jean Kim’s keynote and Siobhan O’Sullivan’s concluding roundtable, attendees will be limited to staff and students of the University of Sheffield. Please email cjoliver-hobley1@sheffield.ac.uk to let us know that you plan to attend.

Schedule

Thursday, November 8th 2018

9:00 am    Welcome from ShARC Co-Director John Miller and PhD Organizing Committee, Peter Sands and Christie Oliver-Hobley

9:30 am    Panel 1: Hybrids and Assemblages (Chaired by Bob McKay)

Peter Sands, ‘Human-Virus-Machine: Jack Finney’s The Body Snatchers (1955)’

Danny Bowman, ‘Horsepower: Animals in Automotive Culture (1895-1935)’

Daniel Goodley, ‘Posthuman disability studies + Animal studies: Theorising with young disabled people with life-limiting impairments’

10:45 am    Coffee

11:15 am    Panel 2: Pro-Animal Philosophies (Chaired by John Miller)

Christie Oliver-Hobley, ‘“A Transposedness, and yet not.” J. A. Baker’s The Peregrine (1967) as Heideggerian Mitgang

Charlotte O’Neill, ‘Edward Carpenter: a Non-human Bibliography’

Alice Higgs, ‘Taking Animals Seriously in Margaret Atwood’s Life Before Man (1979)’

12:30 pm    Lunch

13:30 pm    Panel 3: More-than-Human Environments (Chaired by Sarah Bezan)

Veronica Fibisan, ‘The Shoreline in Mark Dickinson’s Littoral and Tender Geometries

Brock Bersaglio and Charis Enns, ‘Decolonising Human-Wildlife Conflict Prevention Through Oral Histories of Co-Existence’

Cecilia Tricker-Walsh, ‘Edward O. Wilson’s Eremocene and Breece D’J Pancake’s Trilobites.

Hannah Dickinson, ‘“Black Gold” and Grey Areas: Interrogating the Geopolitical Ecology of caviar regulation in the European Union’

3:15 pm walk to NFCA

3:30 pm     Tour of the National Fairground and Circus Archive

4:30 pm     Break

5:00 pm    Claire Jean Kim, ‘Murder and Mattering in Harambe’s House’

     ** Please register at goo.gl/aNneUP **

7:00 pm    Optional Drinks & Nibbles at The Red Deer

Friday, November 9th 2018

9:30 am    Coffee

10:00 am    Panel 4: Our Nearest and Dearest (Chaired by Siobhan O’Sullivan)

Joe Mansfield, ‘Fictional Reconfigurations of Animal Life in the Laboratory Space’

Ming Panha, ‘“The use of dogs”:  The Question of the Nature of Animals in “The Adventure of the Creeping Man” (1924) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’

Thomas Webb, ‘Why obesity among domestic cats and dogs is a human problem – and, thus, how psychology can help’

11:15 am    Coffee

11:30 am    Siobhan O’Sullivan interviews Claire Jean Kim for Knowing Animals Podcast

12:30 pm    Lunch

1:30 pm    Masterclass by Siobhan O’Sullivan and Claire Jean Kim (for ShARC PhD and MA Students only)

2:30 pm    Coffee

2:45 pm    Panel 5: Farm Animals in Context (Chaired by Alasdair Cochrane)

Merisa Thompson, ‘Changing human-animal relations in the UK dairy sector’

Samantha Outhwaite, ‘Conflicts of understanding in what is Ethical food production-consumption: Exploring Non-Human-Human Relations in the Context of Intensive Pig Farming’

Diana De Ritter, ‘Killing Babe: Dietetic Education and Juvenile Rites of Passage in The Peppermint Pig

4:00 pm    Closing Roundtable: Why Do Animal Studies? (Chaired by Siobhan O’Sullivan)

5:00 pm    End of ShARC Tales Workshop

 

ShARC are delighted to be hosting a talk by Dr Helen Cowie (History, University of York), ‘Doing a Roaring Trade’: Lion Taming in Nineteenth-Century Britain:

In January 1850, tragedy struck at Wombwell’s menagerie when the female lion tamer, Ellen Bright was killed by a tiger at Chatham in Kent. Ellen, who was only seventeen, had been performing in a cage with a lion and a tiger. She was coming to the end of her act when the tiger pounced on her, ‘seizing her furiously by the neck’ and sinking its teeth into her throat. Though two surgeons tried to revive the stricken woman, her injuries proved fatal, and she died at the scene. One of the surgeons stated that she had suffered ‘a very large wound under the chin, which, aided by the shock her system had sustained, produced death’.

The violent end of Ellen Bright received widespread coverage in the contemporary press and generated a national outcry against the use of female tamers in menageries. Popularly known as ‘Lion Queens’, female performers had become fashionable in contemporary animal shows, titillating the public with daring feats and risqué costumes. They attracted large audiences, but also sharp criticism from certain sectors of the press, which condemned lion taming as a reckless and voyeuristic pursuit.

Focusing on Ellen and three other famous lion tamers, this paper examines the evolution of wild animal acts in 19th-century Britain and assesses their wider social significance. Why did people go to watch lion taming performances? What were the emotional dynamics of the wild beast act, and did female and non-European lion tamers challenge or perpetuate existing stereotypes of women and colonial subjects in Victorian culture? I situate Ellen’s untimely death within a wider debate about wild beast performances, which were viewed by some contemporaries as sensational, morally suspect, and potentially exploitative of both humans and animals.

Dr Cowie’s talk will take place from 3pm on Tuesday 17th April 2018 in Firth Court FC-G02 (which is one of the garret rooms in the tower). We hope to see you there!

 

We are thoroughly delighted to welcome Dr Jonathan Skinner to our next ShARC research seminar to deliver a talk on ‘Ethno Plunderphonics: On Some Mockingbird Transcriptions’.
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Jonathan is Associate Professor at the University of Warwick and teaches on the English and Comparative Literary Studies program. His interests include Contemporary Poetry and Poetics; Ecocriticism and Environmental Studies; Ethnopoetics; Sound Studies; Critical Theory; and Translation. He is founder and editor of ecopoetics, a journal which features creative-critical intersections between writing and ecology.
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The seminar will be held in collaboration with the Centre for Poetry and Poetics on Tuesday, 12th December at the Portobello Centre, Pool Seminar Room B59a, and is scheduled to start at 3pm.
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Curious listeners may be interested in consulting his SoundCloud page further: https://soundcloud.com/ecopoetics
Northern Animals

Dinesh Wadiwel Image

We were delighted to welcome the University of Sydney’s Dinesh Wadiwel to Sheffield to deliver a talk on ‘Pro-Animal Politics – Do We Need a Concept of Ideology?’

The seminar tok place at 10am on Thursday, 2nd February 2017 in Art Tower, Room AT-LT05.

An abstract of the talk can be found here.

Reading Group: Dinesh Wadiwel’s The War Against Animals.

In The War Against Animals, Dinesh Wadiwel draws on critical political theory to provide a provocative account of how our mainstay relationships with animals are founded upon systemic hostility and bio-political sovereign violence.

The reading group took place from 3pm on Tuesday, 6th December at 9 Mappin Street, 9MS-G14.
29th Nov Jill Atkins Extinction

Jill Atkins, ‘Building an ark of emancipatory extinction prevention mechanisms of accounting and accountability’

Tuesday 29th November, 3pm. Diamond Building, DIA-WR1

Read the abstract here.

Conferences – Autumn 2016

British Animal Studies Network presents:

Conserving
18th and 19th November 2016

Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield

Plenary speakers:
Rosaleen Duffy (University of Sheffield); David Farrier (University of Edinburgh); Helen Tiffin (University of Wollongong)

Research Seminar series – Autumn 2016

Sune Nov 15 Presentation

Sune Borkfelt, ‘Sensing the Animal in Slaughterhouse Fictions’ Tuesday 15th November, 3pm. Firth Court, Room F02a

Read the abstract here.

bee poster final

Susan McHugh, ‘Honeybee Fictions and Indigenous Frictions’, Tuesday October 18th, 3pm. Hicks Building, Seminar Room F30

Audio available to listen to online here.

Research Seminar series – Spring 2016

rohman finished

mara poster final

krithika poster final

Barry Hines poster final

PALS poster finished

alasdair sharc poster final

lawrence post finished

 

goths poster correct and final

carol adams poster final

anat why look final crop

Research Seminar series – Spring 2014-15

An archived program of our Spring 2014-15 seminar series can be found here.

16th March, 5.15-6.30pm. Richard Roberts Building, B79.
Tom Tyler (Philosophy & Cultural Studies, Oxford Brookes)
“Being Prey: Endless Runner”
Jointly hosted by Sheffield Centre for Visual Studies and Videogames Reading Group

1st April, 4-5.30pm, Jessop West, Seminar Room 8
Rosaleen Duffy (Politics, SOAS) and Siobhan O’Sullivan (Politics, UNSW)
Rosaleen Duffy, “Responsibility to protect? Ecocide, interventionism and saving biodiversity”
Siobhan O’Sullivan, “Who’s looking at what? The politics and ethics of drones in animal activism”

15th April, 5.30-6.30pm, Humanities Research Institute (HRI)
Megan Cavell (Medieval Studies, Durham University)
“The Habits and Habitats of Old English Riddle-Animals”
Jointly hosted by Sheffield Medieval and Ancient Research Seminar

29th April, 5.15-6.30pm, Richard Roberts Building, B79
Naomi Sykes (Zooarchaeology, University of Nottingham)
“Human-animal studies in archaeology: views from the past, perspectives on the present”

5th May Day symposium, Jessop West Exhibition Space
Umberto Albarella (Zooarchaeology, Sheffield) and Angelos Hadjikoumis
“Humans, livestock and their landscape: past, present and future”

6th May, 4.30-5.30pm, Richard Roberts Building, A87
David Herman (Literature, Durham University)
“Storytelling beyond the Human: Modelling Animal Experiences in Narrative Worlds”
Jointly hosted with School of English Research Seminar

20th May, 4.30-5.30pm, Humanities Research Institute (HRI) seminar rooms
Lourdes Orozco (Theatre & Performance, University of Leeds)
“Thinking about the Posthuman Actor: Animals in Performance Practices”
Jointly hosted with School of English Research Seminar

Reading and Discussion Group – Spring 2014-15

An archive of our 2014-15 reading group is online here.

Reading Animals

A major international English Studies conference focused on literary animal studies, Reading Animals took place at the University of Sheffield on 17th – 20th July, 2014.

Keynote speakers at the conference were Tom Tyler, Erica Fudge, Laura Brown, Kevin Hutchings, Diana Donald, Cary Wolfe, and Susan McHugh.

An archive of the conference program and abstracts is available here: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/english/animal/readinganimals

Click here for a Storify archive of tweets from the conference.

Animal Machines: Animals and/as Technologies

Hosted at the University of Sheffield on 18th October, 2013, Animal Machines was a one-day interdisciplinary symposium to examine the interrelations of animals and technology, featuring contributions from literature, film, the social sciences, and information studies.

The pervasive association of animality and technicity is not only an ontological question but also structures various material and representational practices. Western philosophy has long struggled with this relation, particularly in the aftermath of Descartes’ famous assertion of the mechanistic essence of animality. The ethical and political dimensions of these ontological questions are brought into focus in concrete ways through the lived experience of both humans and nonhuman animals in their everyday embodied interaction with technologies.

Speakers

Anat Pick, Seán McCorry, Fabienne Collignon, Clara Mancini, Richard Twine, Robert McKay, John Miller, Matthew Cole, Emily Thew.

An archive of the symposium is available here.

The Animal Gaze Returned

The Animal Gaze returned was a major exhibition of contemporary animal-themed artworks, hosted at the Sheffield Institute of Arts Gallery, Sheffield Hallam University, 2nd August – 2nd September, 2013.

You can view the photostream of the “The Animal Gaze Returned” exhibition here.

When you are caught in The Animal Gaze Returned, you will find that the fascination of animal worlds poses conceptual and ethical challenges to human priorities. Artists in this exhibition question the way humans look at animals, how animals return that look, and how this shapes human interactions with them; how people connect, and often don’t connect, with other beings.

In The Animal Gaze Returned, contemporary artists extend and complicate traditions in Fine Art by representing animals as more than objects of decoration or status. They use strategies that usurp conventions of anthropomorphic symbolism to recognize that animals’ visual presence – and ability to look – shape and are shaped by a wide variety of media, from painting, video and photography to sculpture and performance.

Artists
Suky Best, Olivier Richon, Andrea Roe, Bob and Roberta Smith, Rosemarie McGoldrick, Darren Harvey-Regan, Steve Baker, Lucy Powell, Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson, Ian Brown, Aurelia Mihai, Greta Alfaro, Cartwright & Jordan, Kathy High and Edwina Ashton.
Information on the artists and their work.

Curators
Chloë Brown, artist, senior lecturer in Fine Art at Sheffield Hallam University,
Rosie McGoldrick, artist, senior lecturer in Fine Art at The CASS, London Metropolitan University and Dr. Robert McKay, writer and lecturer in English Literature at University of Sheffield.

An Animal Space

The exhibition An Animal Space took place in the Jessop West Building foyer at University of Sheffield from 2 August to 30 August. It displayed the early results of an ongoing collaboration between Chloë Brown and Robert McKay (curators of The Animal Gaze Returned), which brings the methods of contemporary art practice and literary criticism into conversation to reflect on human fascination by and use of other animals.

The exhibition combined sculpture, drawing and text and explores the connections, real and imaginary, between the photographic, material and textual traces of those animals who undertook early space flights, and the representation of such animals in postwar literary fiction. The works respond with empathy and playfulness to this history of dogs, spiders, mice and monkeys as astronauts (animalnauts?) and leave the viewer wondering — what flights of imagination are necessary to truly encounter animals in space? Also displayed as part of the exhibition, An Illustrated Theriography comprises high quality reproductions of jacket designs, illustrative quotations and exploratory annotations; it offers a visual record of the animal worlds presented in some of the most unusual and imaginative postwar literature.

A photostream archive of the exhibition is online here.